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Knowing the laws and regulations regarding drones in your state is crucial before any flight. If you currently reside in Texas and own a drone, the following information will be very important to you.

More Resources

This article will give a brief overview of the laws in your state, but we can’t keep cover all the minutae in only two thousand words. That’s why we highly recommend that you do some research on your own time and, ideally, enroll in a professional course if you’re actually looking to get certified. Though there’s lots of options for learning more about drone laws, we highly recommend the#1 Rated Professional Course: Drone Pilot Ground School. Get $50 Off as a Dronethusiast reader, just click the link and sign up. It’s a great way to learn about drone laws and piloting that’s cheaper than most of its competition, you can purchase it once and own it forever and they’re constantly updating their professional training.

All that said, let’s move on to the important stuff.

Flying Over Texas

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For the best view of the Dallas skyline, Trammel Crow Park is the best place to be. The park has plenty of open space that is paired with the Trinity River and large areas of land to create the picture perfect setting to fly in.

Speaking of the Trinity River, White Rock is another great location in Dallas to fly a drone in. The serene lake, 70 acres of land, the Botanical Garden and the Dallas Arboretum make the White Rock reservoir one of the best places to capture some beautiful shots.

George Bush Park, located in the western region of Houston, brings adrenaline and sheer beauty together. The shooting range on the southeast side should definitely be avoided, but everywhere else in this area has plenty to offer. The lake is magical during the evening shortly before the sky grows dark.

Austin, however, may have the best locations yet. Butler Park, for one, brings the city and nature all rolled up into one. From here you can capture the waterfront, the Colorado River, and the skyline of downtown Austin.

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The Registering Process in Texas

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requires that all Small Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) owners follow strict regulations and laws. You will need to file your name, home address and your email address as a start.
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From there, you will receive a Certificate of Aircraft Registration and Proof of Ownership. These will include an identification number for your aircraft. You must have this number displayed on your drone at all times. The number will be valid for up to three years.

All aircraft that weighs more than 0.55 pounds, or 250 grams, and less than 55 pounds, or 25 kilograms, must be registered. This also includes any added payloads, such as an onboard camera.

You must be at least 13-years-old in order to register and, effective December 21st, 2015, all newly purchased or made drones must be registered before their first flight. You are able to register through a paper-based process, but you can also do so online by clicking here.

Proximity to Airports in Texas

As a general rule of thumb, and in accordance with the law from the FAA, you may not fly within a 5-mile radius of any airport. In 2012 the FAA enacted the Modernization and Reauthorization Act which requires hobbyist drone operators, meaning residential, to contact air traffic control and/or airport management if they are operating within a 5-mile radius of any local airport.

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This is enacted nationwide, not only in Texas, under Part 101 of the Act, being Special Rule for Model Aircraft, to ensure that drone operations under unsafe conditions are disapproved before the drone can be launched.

Regardless of the local airport you will be flying near, and possibly breaching airspace, you will need to contact either the airport air traffic control tower or the airport operator.

You will need to establish an agreed-upon operating procedure with airport air traffic or the airport operator and answer a couple of questions. For example, questions relating to how long you are going to be flying for.

Unique Drone Laws in Texas

Texas has drone laws that are solely unique to the state, other than the existing nationwide laws and regulations that are already set by the FAA. At this time of writing all bills, laws, acts, etc., listed are in effect.

Government Code Chapter 423. USE OF UNMANNED AIRCRAFT

Sec. 423.001. DEFINITION. In this chapter, “image” means any capturing of sound waves, thermal, infrared, ultraviolet, visible light, or other electromagnetic waves, odor, or other conditions existing on or about real property in this state or an individual located on that property.

Added by Acts 2013, 83rd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1390 (H.B. 912), Sec. 2, eff. September 1, 2013.

Sec. 423.002. NONAPPLICABILITY.

It is lawful to capture an image using an unmanned aircraft in this state:

for the purpose of professional or scholarly research and development or for another academic purpose by a person acting on behalf of an institution of higher education or a private or independent institution of higher education, as those terms are defined by Section 61.003, Education Code, including a person who:

is a professor, employee, or student of the institution; or

(B) is under contract with or otherwise acting under the direction or on behalf of the institution;

in airspace designated as a test site or range authorized by the Federal Aviation Administration for the purpose of integrating unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace;

as part of an operation, exercise, or mission of any branch of the United States military;

if the image is captured by a satellite for the purposes of mapping;

if the image is captured by or for an electric or natural gas utility:

for operations and maintenance of utility facilities for the purpose of maintaining utility system reliability and integrity;

(B) for inspecting utility facilities to determine repair, maintenance, or replacement needs during and after construction of such facilities;

(C) for assessing vegetation growth for the purpose of maintaining clearances on utility easements; and

(D) for utility facility routing and siting for the purpose of providing utility service;

with the consent of the individual who owns or lawfully occupies the real property captured in the image;

pursuant to a valid search or arrest warrant;

if the image is captured by a law enforcement authority or a person who is under contract with or otherwise acting under the direction or on behalf of a law enforcement authority:

in immediate pursuit of a person law enforcement officers have reasonable suspicion or probable cause to suspect has committed an offense, not including misdemeanors or offenses punishable by a fine only;

(B) for the purpose of documenting a crime scene where an offense, not including misdemeanors or offenses punishable by a fine only, has been committed;

(C) for the purpose of investigating the scene of:

(i) a human fatality;

(ii) a motor vehicle accident causing death or serious bodily injury to a person; or

(iii) any motor vehicle accident on a state highway or federal interstate or highway;

(D) in connection with the search for a missing person;

(E) for the purpose of conducting a high-risk tactical operation that poses a threat to human life; or

(F) of private property that is generally open to the public where the property owner consents to law enforcement public safety responsibilities;

if the image is captured by state or local law enforcement authorities, or a person who is under contract with or otherwise acting under the direction or on behalf of state authorities, for the purpose of:

surveying the scene of a catastrophe or other damage to determine whether a state of emergency should be declared;

(B) preserving public safety, protecting property, or surveying damage or contamination during a lawfully declared state of emergency; or

(C) conducting routine air quality sampling and monitoring, as provided by state or local law;

at the scene of a spill, or a suspected spill, of hazardous materials;

for the purpose of fire suppression;

for the purpose of rescuing a person whose life or well-being is in imminent danger;

if the image is captured by a Texas licensed real estate broker in connection with the marketing, sale, or financing of real property, provided that no individual is identifiable in the image;

of real property or a person on real property that is within 25 miles of the United States border;

from a height no more than eight feet above ground level in a public place, if the image was captured without using any electronic, mechanical, or other means to amplify the image beyond normal human perception;

of public real property or a person on that property;

if the image is captured by the owner or operator of an oil, gas, water, or other pipeline for the purpose of inspecting, maintaining, or repairing pipelines or other related facilities, and is captured without the intent to conduct surveillance on an individual or real property located in this state;

in connection with oil pipeline safety and rig protection;

in connection with port authority surveillance and security;

if the image is captured by a registered professional land surveyor in connection with the practice of professional surveying, as those terms are defined by Section 1071.002, Occupations Code, provided that no individual is identifiable in the image; or

if the image is captured by a professional engineer licensed under Subchapter G, Chapter 1001, Occupations Code, in connection with the practice of engineering, as defined by Section 1001.003, Occupations Code, provided that no individual is identifiable in the image.

(b) This chapter does not apply to the manufacture, assembly, distribution, or sale of an unmanned aircraft.

Added by Acts 2013, 83rd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1390 (H.B. 912), Sec. 2, eff. September 1, 2013.

Amended by: Acts 2015, 84th Leg., R.S., Ch. 360 (H.B. 2167), Sec. 1, eff. September 1, 2015.

Sec. 423.003. OFFENSE: ILLEGAL USE OF UNMANNED AIRCRAFT TO CAPTURE IMAGE.

A person commits an offense if the person uses an unmanned aircraft to capture an image of an individual or privately owned real property in this state with the intent to conduct surveillance on the individual or property captured in the image.

(b) An offense under this section is a Class C misdemeanor.

(c) It is a defense to prosecution under this section that the person destroyed the image:

as soon as the person had knowledge that the image was captured in violation of this section; and

without disclosing, displaying, or distributing the image to a third party.

(d) In this section, “intent” has the meaning assigned by Section 6.03, Penal Code.

Added by Acts 2013, 83rd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1390 (H.B. 912), Sec. 2, eff. September 1, 2013.

Sec. 423.004. OFFENSE: POSSESSION, DISCLOSURE, DISPLAY, DISTRIBUTION, OR USE OF IMAGE.

A person commits an offense if the person:

captures an image in violation of Section 423.003; and

possesses, discloses, displays, distributes, or otherwise uses that image.

(b) An offense under this section for the possession of an image is a Class C misdemeanor. An offense under this section for the disclosure, display, distribution, or other use of an image is a Class B misdemeanor.

(c) Each image a person possesses, discloses, displays, distributes, or otherwise uses in violation of this section is a separate offense.

(d) It is a defense to prosecution under this section for the possession of an image that the person destroyed the image as soon as the person had knowledge that the image was captured in violation of Section 423.003.

(e) It is a defense to prosecution under this section for the disclosure, display, distribution, or other use of an image that the person stopped disclosing, displaying, distributing, or otherwise using the image as soon as the person had knowledge that the image was captured in violation of Section 423.003.

Added by Acts 2013, 83rd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1390 (H.B. 912), Sec. 2, eff. September 1, 2013.

Sec. 423.0045. OFFENSE: OPERATION OF UNMANNED AIRCRAFT OVER CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE FACILITY.

FREE Part 107 Training Videos

In this section:

“Critical infrastructure facility” means:

one of the following, if completely enclosed by a fence or other physical barrier that is obviously designed to exclude intruders, or if clearly marked with a sign or signs that are posted on the property, are reasonably likely to come to the attention of intruders, and indicate that entry is forbidden:

(i) a petroleum or alumina refinery;

(ii) an electrical power generating facility, substation, switching station, or electrical control center;

(iii) a chemical, polymer, or rubber manufacturing facility;

(iv) a water intake structure, water treatment facility, wastewater treatment plant, or pump station;

(v) a natural gas compressor station;

(vi) a liquid natural gas terminal or storage facility;

(vii) a telecommunications central switching office;

(viii) a port, railroad switching yard, trucking terminal, or other freight transportation facility;

(ix) a gas processing plant, including a plant used in the processing, treatment, or fractionation of natural gas;

(x) a transmission facility used by a federally licensed radio or television station;

(xi) a steelmaking facility that uses an electric arc furnace to make steel; or

(xii) a dam that is classified as a high hazard by the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality; or

(B) any portion of an aboveground oil, gas, or chemical pipeline that is enclosed by a fence or other physical barrier that is obviously designed to exclude intruders.

“Dam” means any barrier, including any appurtenant structures, that is constructed for the purpose of permanently or temporarily impounding water.

(b) A person commits an offense if the person intentionally or knowingly:

operates an unmanned aircraft over a critical infrastructure facility and the unmanned aircraft is not higher than 400 feet above ground level;

allows an unmanned aircraft to make contact with a critical infrastructure facility, including any person or object on the premises of or within the facility; or

allows an unmanned aircraft to come within a distance of a critical infrastructure facility that is close enough to interfere with the operations of or cause a disturbance to the facility.

(c) This section does not apply to conduct described by Subsection (b) that is committed by:

the federal government, the state, or a governmental entity;

a person under contract with or otherwise acting under the direction or on behalf of the federal government, the state, or a governmental entity;

a law enforcement agency;

a person under contract with or otherwise acting under the direction or on behalf of a law enforcement agency;

an owner or operator of the critical infrastructure facility;

a person under contract with or otherwise acting under the direction or on behalf of an owner or operator of the critical infrastructure facility;

a person who has the prior written consent of the owner or operator of the critical infrastructure facility;

the owner or occupant of the property on which the critical infrastructure facility is located or a person who has the prior written consent of the owner or occupant of that property; or

an operator of an unmanned aircraft that is being used for a commercial purpose, if the operator is authorized by the Federal Aviation Administration to conduct operations over that airspace.

(d) An offense under this section is a Class B misdemeanor, except that the offense is a Class A misdemeanor if the actor has previously been convicted under this section.

Added by Acts 2015, 84th Leg., R.S., Ch. 1033 (H.B. 1481), Sec. 1, eff. September 1, 2015.

Sec. 423.005. ILLEGALLY OR INCIDENTALLY CAPTURED IMAGES NOT SUBJECT TO DISCLOSURE.

Except as otherwise provided by Subsection (b), an image captured in violation of Section 423.003, or an image captured by an unmanned aircraft that was incidental to the lawful capturing of an image:

may not be used as evidence in any criminal or juvenile proceeding, civil action, or administrative proceeding;

is not subject to disclosure, inspection, or copying under Chapter 552; and

is not subject to discovery, subpoena, or other means of legal compulsion for its release.

(b) An image described by Subsection (a) may be disclosed and used as evidence to prove a violation of this chapter and is subject to discovery, subpoena, or other means of legal compulsion for that purpose.

Added by Acts 2013, 83rd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1390 (H.B. 912), Sec. 2, eff. September 1, 2013.

Sec. 423.006. CIVIL ACTION.

An owner or tenant of privately owned real property located in this state may bring against a person who, in violation of Section 423.003, captured an image of the property or the owner or tenant while on the property an action to:

enjoin a violation or imminent violation of Section 423.003 or 423.004;

recover a civil penalty of:

$5,000 for all images captured in a single episode in violation of Section 423.003; or

(B) $10,000 for disclosure, display, distribution, or other use of any images captured in a single episode in violation of Section 423.004; or

recover actual damages if the person who captured the image in violation of Section 423.003 discloses, displays, or distributes the image with malice.

(b) For purposes of recovering the civil penalty or actual damages under Subsection (a), all owners of a parcel of real property are considered to be a single owner and all tenants of a parcel of real property are considered to be a single tenant.

(c) In this section, “malice” has the meaning assigned by Section 41.001, Civil Practice and Remedies Code.

(d) In addition to any civil penalties authorized under this section, the court shall award court costs and reasonable attorney’s fees to the prevailing party.

(e) Venue for an action under this section is governed by Chapter 15, Civil Practice and Remedies Code.

(f) An action brought under this section must be commenced within two years from the date the image was:

captured in violation of Section 423.003; or

initially disclosed, displayed, distributed, or otherwise used in violation of Section 423.004.

Added by Acts 2013, 83rd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1390 (H.B. 912), Sec. 2, eff. September 1, 2013.

Sec. 423.007. RULES FOR USE BY LAW ENFORCEMENT.

The Department of Public Safety shall adopt rules and guidelines for use of an unmanned aircraft by a law enforcement authority in this state.

Added by Acts 2013, 83rd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1390 (H.B. 912), Sec. 2, eff. September 1, 2013.

Sec. 423.008. REPORTING BY LAW ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

Not earlier than January 1 and not later than January 15 of each odd-numbered year, each state law enforcement agency and each county or municipal law enforcement agency located in a county or municipality, as applicable, with a population greater than 150,000, that used or operated an unmanned aircraft during the preceding 24 months shall issue a written report to the governor, the lieutenant governor, and each member of the legislature and shall:

retain the report for public viewing; and

post the report on the law enforcement agency’s publicly accessible website, if one exists.

(b) The report must include:

the number of times an unmanned aircraft was used, organized by date, time, location, and the types of incidents and types of justification for the use;

the number of criminal investigations aided by the use of an unmanned aircraft and a description of how the unmanned aircraft aided each investigation;

the number of times an unmanned aircraft was used for a law enforcement operation other than a criminal investigation, the dates and locations of those operations, and a description of how the unmanned aircraft aided each operation;

the type of information collected on an individual, residence, property, or area that was not the subject of a law enforcement operation and the frequency of the collection of this information; and

the total cost of acquiring, maintaining, repairing, and operating or otherwise using each unmanned aircraft for the preceding 24 months.

Added by Acts 2013, 83rd Leg., R.S., Ch. 1390 (H.B. 912), Sec. 2, eff. September 1, 2013.

Other Legal Issues With Drones in Texas

Unlike other states, Texas faces legal issues that are pretty thorough, to say the least. Texan citizens flying drones are restricted from flying privately for the sole purpose of taking pictures. In addition to this strict restriction, a large chunk of exceptions has been carved for law enforcement.

One of the most odd legal issues with drones in Texas would have to be the difference between a drone and a remote helicopter. You can, for example, strap a camera on a remote helicopter and photograph consenting adults, but you have to be extremely careful and more precise in accordance with the law when doing so with a drone.

Overall, other legal issues surrounding drones and the state of Texas can be considered somewhat backward when you look at drone laws in other states.

FAQ on Texas Law and Drones

If you do not see your question, or an answer to it, listed below, feel free to get in touch with us and we’ll gladly give you one.

Is a drone/UAS considered the same as a model aircraft?

The United States Congress has defined and concluded that a model aircraft is only considered a drone or a UAS when the following points are met:

It’s flown for recreational purposes or as a hobby and not for any business or commercial reasons
It’s flown within visible distance, meaning being able to see it at all times, of the individual operating it
It’s capable of sustaining flight within the atmosphere, meaning that it can fly

If your model aircraft, regardless of whether or not you acquired it pre-built or built it yourself, meets the above points to your knowledge, it’s considered a drone/UAS.

What is the Small UAS Rule?

The Small UAS Rule requires those who have unmanned aircraft systems, or UAS, that weigh less than 55 pounds, payload included, to register their aircraft with the FAA. This only applies to recreational or hobby fliers and not commercial drone use, however.

Is the FAA’s Small UAS Rule still in effect?

Yes, it has been in effect from August 29th of 2016 and is still in effect at this time of writing.

Do I have to carry my Certificate of Aircraft Registration while flying my UAS at all times?

Yes, you must have the registration certificate from the FAA at all times during flight operation. In accordance with federal law, all UAS operators must show their certificate of registration to any local, state, or federal law enforcement officer when they are asked to do so.

What do I do for registration if my UAS is over the 55-pound limit?

If your UAS weighs more than 55 pounds, including payload, you will need to register it by clicking here.

How do I request flight permission from Air Traffic Control to operate within airspace class B, C, D, or E?

You can contact Air Traffic Control for flight permission through the FAA portal available online by clicking here.

sUAS Service Agreement

Drone Laws in Texas

Knowing the laws, regulations, restrictions, etc., regarding drones in your state is extremely important. Remember to educate yourself, follow the rules, fly safely and responsibly, and have fun!

There are 22 comments:

  • ChanceG at 2:56 am

    As a hobbies you no longer have to register your UAV, and if it is registered the registration number is supposed to be located in a visible spot on UAV.

  • Magdalena at 8:15 pm

    Hi !

    I just got the SPARK DJI DRONE (300 g) as a christmas present.

    I am planning to spend New Years at The Woodlands and I would love to take my mini drone with me for recreational purposes.

    Do I need to register my drone if it is about 300 g ? If so, what is the process I need to follow ? Are there any restricted zones in The Woodlands, TX ?

    Thank you very much for your time.

    I hope to hear from you soon.

  • JB at 9:51 pm

    What are the laws in reference to flying over private property? What is the lowest legal height I can fly over PP?

  • Ottomatic at 6:00 am

    You are not required to register your drone but if you have already, then you are entitled to a $5 refund from the FAA. Google the form, fill it out and mail it to the FAA. It was the FAA that overstepped their authority and broke the law.

    • Derek M at 1:51 am

      You are now required to register your drone again.

  • Dani at 9:45 pm

    I would like to use a drone to look for a missing pet in the area it was last spotted. Is it legal to fly a drone over a neighborhood (private property) for this reason?

  • LuAnn Howland at 4:50 am

    I live on a hundred and seventy Acres out of the country. Day and night I am subject to hobbyist drones that not only use my property like it’s their personal UAV Six Flags Over Texas but every time I open the door at night and a crack of light splits the Darkness they come flying up to my house. They turn off their lights thinking they cannot be seen so they can covertly sneak up but I’ve gotten very good at spotting them. Do you hobbyist drone operators have any idea how disarming and uncomfortable it is to know that every move you make is being watched. Do you not have anything else to do? Having drones flying over my property in droves would be bad enough but they don’t just fly over my home they fly up to it and hover. I’ve had to put heavy wooden shutters over my windows because I can actually see them jockeying for position to spy through the windows. There’s nothing special about me or my house. It’s just they’re out there trolling looking for any bit of movement that they can zoom up on and watch. I don’t know who these people are I don’t know what they’re doing or why they’re doing it. I’ve done everything I know to do to get my feelings across to these unfeeling UAV operators that they have taking the joy out of my home, taken the pleasure of the Solitude of living in the country and the safety from prying eyes. My family did not get here. We have been good stewards of this same property since Texas was a republic.. I always enjoyed the night sky and knowing I was out in the country and could take full advantage of it. Now the sky doesn’t even look like it used to anymore. Every year I would write down the dates of all of the meteor showers so I could enjoy them but that pleasure has been taken away from . I can’t even go outside without having at least a half a dozen or more drones circling over my head. They even have some kind of drawn that’s able to imitate a meteor. They have taken away the Wonder and joy I got out of the night sky. I feel trapped in my home. If you do not have land to fly your drone on then please just don’t buy one but my property is not your playground and you have no right to watch my every move. this is extremely offencive Behavior..

    • Iven O’Hair at 12:13 am

      Shop them down. It’s your property. That would be fun, actually.

    • John Johnson at 11:46 pm

      You’re joking, right? Droves of drones, 24 hours a day, hovering over your home, out of all the houses on farms and ranches in Texas…., just waiting to pounce on any movement…and now, one that imitates a meteor?

  • Luann at 7:23 am

    Yes it would. As it seems I am dealing with humans on the other end of that drone that feel absolutely no concern about me as a person. I fight the urge day and night to keep from shooting them out of the sky. And it wouldn’t be hard to do they make themselves a very easy mark so it’s obvious that they have no fear and feel no obligation to abide by FAA guidelines.. and this is where the FAA chickens out and will not put any laws on the books just suggestions apparently . Which leaves only local deputies to answer complaints and watch helplessly as a drone Zips out of sight the minute they pull up . I have Google this till my eyes crossed it seems to be illegal to shoot them as the FAA claims all the airspace and has made the distinction that a drone is the same as a plane or a helicopter. Which is absurd because never would a manned helicopter hover over my house telephone pole High. incredible nuisance unsettling UAV with no conscience manners Nar etiquette..

    • Truth Police at 3:42 am

      LuAnn’s story is obviously fake or greatly exaggerated; don’t feed the troll.

    • George at 8:08 am

      I’ve seen them too. These are Law Enforcement Drones. They are everywhere in the Houston area at night.

  • Joe Public at 7:29 pm

    This is crazy. They have taken away every possible reason for why the average person would want to fly a drone for recreation. It seems that you can no longer fly above 8 feet and take pictures/video of anything at all without violating some aspect of this law. I realize that drone operators have some responsibility to ensure the safe operation of their drones and not to operate it around critical infrastructure or airports, but the rest of the rules here seem like a violation of our rights. Noone has tried to place the same restrictions on pictures you can take of other people with your regular cellphone. Outrageous!

  • Ryan Carter at 6:08 pm

    New to Droning sorry for this basic question. But if I understand the above correctly, I can’t take pictures of my family in a park with a drone? Or of a lake? ” Texan citizens flying drones are restricted from flying privately for the sole purpose of taking pictures. “

    • Angela Sparks at 12:01 am

      I’m very brand new to drones. Just received one for recreational use. All my research leads me to this, call the Airport /heliport tower with all the info before you fly. Travel to a public place, obey they rules of privacy etc etc etc and then enjoy. It’s not illegal to fly but it’s like a maze to find the right place. Don’t fly over people don’t fly over their homes. Register the drone. If you even think you’re going to look like a business or anyone around study and get 107 licensed. That’s what I’m going to do. Be careful what you upload.
      Wow, having said all that my new drone is going to look new for quite some time.

  • John Fomby at 1:46 pm

    How much of the law pertains to toy drone( ex. 89 grams)?

  • Steve at 8:38 pm

    Needing advice: I belong to a nonprofit Brewster County Texas. The nonprofit owns property that was donated to us and that we are trying to sell. When prospective clients come to see the property a drone shows up spying on the clients sometimes getting as close as ten feet, checking out their vehicles. I suspect it is neighbor not wanting the property to be sold and built on. What recourse do we have? We do not know who owns the drone. Thoughts? Thank you.

  • JenniferWelch at 3:12 pm

    So I am a photographer/artist who just bought a Mavic 2 Pro. I would like to expand my photography craft into aerial photography, mostly I do landscapes and architectural photos in a fine arts style, and now I am wondering if it would it be against the laws or regulations for me to use my drone for this application? It is not a commercial application, but a hobby….I am somewhat confused by what it means in saying Texan citizens flying drones are restricted from flying privately for the sole purpose of taking pictures. Does that mean I need a 107 certification to be able to fly and take photos?

    • Rick at 3:33 am

      I am so confused about that part as well as the below 8 feet rule. Why can’t this be understandable?

  • Mason at 12:13 am

    Is it legal for an employer to fly a drone over employees workspace and collect surveillance during work hours?

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